Category: Brown Trout


A couple of weeks ago I posted an article written by Martin Maffioli of MyM FlyCast in Tierra del Fuego. I promised to take a shot at translating the tale for my English speaking friends. What follows is what I hope to be a pretty fair representation of Martin’s account of a trip he took at the end of last years fishing season with his good friend Sebastian.

Since Trout Season is now opening again for the new year, I’m sure Martin and Sebastian are already back on the water looking to relive a little (or a lot) of last year’s experience. For the moment at least, I’m living vicariously though this experience and others. I think I’ll have to do something about that very soon…

JB

Toward the end of the fishing season, my friend Sebastian called me and we started talking about his desire to do some fishing, but his call had an ulterior motive as well. After some time, he finally confessed his desire to achieve a personal record; the largest trout of his life. I didn’t hesitate for a moment and we started to put the trip together. Soon we had reserved our location, one of the most spectacular fishing spots on the planet: the Río Grande.

Why the Río Grande? Because it has the best Sea Run Brown Trout (or “inmates” as they have been referred to a Spanish bibliography). Stocked in the 1930s, they are born in the river and at the appropriate age they migrate into the ocean to feed and grow. Meanwhile they take on a silver coloration in order to adapt to the environment and eventually return to the river, usually to mate and reproduce. Very often this does not depend on the maturity of the fish. Unlike Salmon, Trout don’t die in the process and may return several times over the years. Another advantage of the Río Grande is protected and free from pollution, excess food sources, nets or natural competitors.

The pool we fished during the morning of our trip is located in Sector 10 and is known as the “Ojo Negro” (Black Eye). There, Sebastian caught three trout of 4, 6 and 5 kilos on a #7 Sage, intermediate line and Green Machine fly.

After lunch we went back to our pool. Sebastian was shocked to see so many trout leaping about. We decided to use a similar set up to what we had used in the morning: #7 rod, extra fast line, 2.5 meter leader and the Green Machine.

Sebastian caught 4 more trout in this order; 5kg, 4kg, 6kg & 3kg until about 8pm; the magical hour of sunset, at which time we decided to change the line for a sinking 3, 1.8 meter leader and a “humpy” fly tied with a salmon hook number 4.

On one of his first casts, just as the tip of the pole started a few light taps and as the line began to tug slightly, the surface of the water exploded! A magnificent trout leapt into view. After the amazement and the spectacular runs and jumps, the 20 minutes of adrenaline were burned in Sebastian’s mind… and the camera. A spectacular 7 kilo brown trout (15.4 lbs).

By Martín Maffioli

 

River Run Brown: +15lbs

MyMFlyCast.com.ar

Tierra del Fuego – Argentina

 

I’ve started getting the fever now that trout season is upon us once again here in Argentina. Browsing through some blogs, fishing forums and other sites, I’ve accumulated a few pictures from the last 10 days to share. Enjoy.

Río Perdicitas (Córdoba)

Río Perdicitas - Darío

Río Jaime

Río Jaime - Maxi

La Hornilla

Lago Exequiel Ramos Mejía - Picún Leufú - Neuquen

It’s finally out, just in time for trout season and anyone planning to make the journey to Argentina and fulfill a dream. I try to re-fulfill the dream every chance I get!!! 😉

Click on the image below to download the PDF document.

 

 

 

Recently I have been in touch with Martin from MyM FlyCast in Tierra del Fuego. I wrote up a little piece a while back about locations in Argentina which have great fishing and are sometimes over looked by fly-fishermen journeying to Argentina. Martin got in touch with me through a fly fishing forum where we are both members. I asked him if he would be interested in sharing an experience and some pictures and he sent me the following. I’m publishing the original version in Spanish and later will publish a translated version. I hope you enjoy it.

The name for this region, Tierra del Fuego, is not the name given to it by the first indigenous people, the Yaghan, who settled here a little while ago (10,000 years ago).

The name for this fantastically striking “Land of Fire” comes from Fernão de Magalhães (the Portuguese explorer, not the GPS company)… AKA Magellan, but we’ll just call him Fergie.

Fergie came across this harsh land in 1520, then came FitzRoy and Darwin.

I wonder what the trout were like back then… but from what I’ve seen, I don’t think they’ve changed much.

JB

A fin de la temporada me llama mi amigo Sebastián con ganas de pescar, pero su llamado ocultaba otra cosa. Luego de largo rato dialogando, terminó confesando su deseo de pescar la trucha récord de su vida. No dudé un instante, y arreglamos el viaje. Al rato estaba reservando un lugar en el pesquero mas espectacular del planeta: el Río Grande.

¿Por que el Río Grande? Porque tiene las mejores Sea Run Brown Trout (o los reos, como se suele encontrar en alguna bibliografía española). Sembradas en la década del 30, nacen en el río y, a determinada edad, parten hacia el mar para alimentarse y crecer. Allí cambian su coloración a plateada con fines de adaptación, y en diversos estadios regresan al río, normalmente para reproducción. Mucha veces, esto no depende del estado de madurez del pez. A diferencia de los salmones, las truchas no mueren en el desove y desovan durante varios años seguidos. Otra ventaja del Río Grande es que la pesca es controlada sin polución, ni exceso de alimento, redes o competidores naturales.

El pool que pescamos por la mañana se encuentra en el sector 10 y se llama el Ojo Negro. Allí Sebastián capturó tres truchas de 4, 6, y 5 Kg., con una caña 7 Sage, línea intermedia y con la conocida Green Machine.

Finalizado el almuerzo y la siesta nos dirigimos a nuestro pool de la tarde. Sebastián se desconcertaba al ver saltar tanta trucha juntas. Decidimos usar un equipo parecido al de la mañana: caña 7, línea extra fast, lider de 2.50 y la Green Machine

Sebastián pescó 4 truchas más (en este orden: 5kg, 4kg, 6kg y 3kg) hasta que se hicieron las 8 de la noche, hora mágica de la caída del sol, en que los fueguinos cambiamos de línea por una de hundimiento 3, líder de 1.80, con una humpi atada en anzuelo salmonero numero 4.

En uno de sus primeros lances, en el momento que le imprimía pequeños movimientos con la punta de la caña y tironcitos en la línea, la superficie del agua explotó. Saltó una magnífica trucha. Luego del asombro y de espectaculares corridas y saltos, los 20 minutos de adrenalina quedaron registrados en la mente de Sebastián y en la cámara fotográfica: una espectacular trucha marrón de 7kg.

Por  Martin Maffioli

 

MyM FlyCast

 

 

MyMFlyCast.com.ar

Tierra del Fuego – Argentina

"Pescando con WoollyBugers"

A fellow “hermano de la pesca”, Marcelo spent his Easter Holiday in Chile fishing for trout with a good friend and guide Eduardo. He took along his son and his wife. He also had the wisdom to take along his wife’s friend. (Good move Marcelo. Sos un genio!) Marcelo’s updated his blog and invited me to share his latest adventure.

Continue reading

A while ago, I started a review of what I know about Trout, but since there are so many species (over 60) I’ll keep this focused on the basics and True Trout today and later we’ll review some species of Char. Here are some that you already know about, and maybe one or two you didn’t.

Future Monster

Rainbow trout are among the most popular game fish. Their natural range is from Alaska to Argentina, but they have been widely introduced in other localities. They are olive to greenish-blue above and silvery below with a prominent red or pink stripe along the side. Stream-dwellers have dark spots on the body, dorsal fins, and tail. Lake-dwellers usually have weak spots or none. Rainbow trout have been recorded weighing up to 50 pounds (22.5 kg)… although I don’t know anyone who’s caught a monster like that, but apparently it is true.

Steelhead

Steelheads are actually sea-running rainbow trout. They go out to sea when they are about a year old, returning upstream to spawn two to five years later. Steelheads have been monitored traveling 2,500 miles (4,000 km) from Adak in the Aleutian Islands to the Columbia River in Washington. While at sea they are colored like the lake-dwelling rainbows (sort of a opaque silvery color), but near spawning time they resemble stream-dwellers. They can weigh up to 35 pounds (16 kg). Now, this is the weird part because, here in Argentina, the Steelheads are usually much larger than the Rainbows. In fact, I would invert the weight estimates between Rainbow and Steelhead here.

Cutthroat

Cutthroat trout get their name from a bright red streak on the throat. They are found in coastal streams from Alaska to northern California and in inland waters of the western United States and Canada. I’ve never heard of them here, but I’m checking with some guides I know in various provinces to be sure. Cutthroats in high mountain streams are often called spotted trout. Sea-running cutthroats enter the ocean when a year old and remain there a year or two before returning to coastal streams to spawn. Cutthroats average around 5 pounds (2.25 kg), but some attain a weight of 40 pounds (18 kg).

Big Brown

Brown trout are native to Europe from Iceland to the Mediterranean Sea, but have been successfully transplanted to other parts of the world. They are golden to greenish brown with darker brown or black spots on the sides, back, and dorsal fins. There is also a sprinkling of red or orange spots, with pale borders, on the upper sides. While fishing the Chimehuin River in the Province of Neuquén two years ago, we actually caught Browns there were both dark brown with orange spots and silvery browns, depending on how many days they had been coming into the river from Lake Huechulafquen (try not to choke on that name, although it might clear up some congestion trying). Apparently, the change in color has to do with the hormones that accompany breeding activity.

Brown just in from the lake. Note the difference in color.

Brown trout are difficult to catch because they are much more aggressive fighters and use the river current to their advantage. Some individuals grow to a weight of 40 pounds (18 kg), but the average brown trout caught in the United States weighs 4 to 7 pounds (1.8 to 3.2 kg), while I believe that the average Brown in Argentina is probably 20% larger.

Golden trout are beautifully colored fish found in mountain streams and lakes in California, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. Again, I’m pretty certain there are no Golden trout in Argentina (although there are Golden Dorado… but that’s another story.) Golden trout, as you may have guessed are pure black… just kidding, actually they are gold in color with a pinkish stripe along the side and a golden or reddish-orange belly.

Golden Trout: Note the red and spots

The dorsal fin, tail, and upper part of the body have dark spots. Golden trout average one pound (450 g) or less, but some attain a weight of about 10 pounds (4.5 kg).

The nice thing about fishing for trout here in Argentina, is that you can’t always be sure what you’ll get. Many species share the same habitat, and compete in the same waters for survival. Depending on when each species is actively spawning or feeding, and depending on whether you are in the right place at the right time, you may catch several different trout in a single outing.

While taking a break from a 4×4 excursion through Mendoza’s Valle Hermoso, in 20 minutes I could three different varieties of trout. In fact, I’m sort of doubtful about one of them. I think it may have been a land-locked salmon, since it was so different from the other two. It was the first I caught that day, and I didn’t have my camera ready, but you can see from these pictures, that the second two trout were definitely different species. Now can you tell which is which?

%d bloggers like this: