After learning about the trout itself, you should learn about rivers. You’ll see that it’s easy to un derstand where you’ll find the fish if you understand the anatomy of a river. Luckily for us, it’s not that complicated. If the trout’s figured it out, hopefully you’ll be able to.

River currents tend to flow with a pattern that repeats itself over and over. Just remember: “riffle-run-pool” Source: Troutlet

Here’s a basic breakdown of each section and how it translates to trout fishing.

 

River Riffle

The riffles of rivers tend to be where water is shallow and the current is strong. In large rivers, this area would be the white-capping rapids. In all rivers, you might see banks of gravel or pebbles breaking the surface of the river throughout the riffle. For the most part, this area of the river will only contain small trout, because the water isn’t quite deep enough to ensure large fish cover.
 

River Run

The run of a river is deeper and slower than the riffle. If you’re looking for the area of the river that house the most adult trout, this is your best bet. It provides good cover and the current is a great moderate speed that allows the lazy trout access to a sufficient buffet. After all, the trout’s ideal habitat is one that provides him with adequate shelter and delivered food.
 

River Pool

River pools are the laziest part of the river. Here the water is deep and the current runs slow. Some trout, especially big Brown trout, may be found here, but the slow current doesn’t provide enough food for most.

Now that you understand the current and its effect on trout, perhaps you can be the one in your group that seems to have a nose for where the action is. Good luck!!

 

Rainbow in a run

 

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